Shopping Cart

Your shopping cart is empty
Visit the shop

#240 Leading with Inside Rudder

I was prompted to write this article because of one applicant with whom I recently flew. It seems that until he flew the tailwheel endorsement course, he suffered from a bad coordination habit and no one thought to correct it. […]

#239 Why Acme Training is Good

I’ll bet THAT title surprised you. The ol’ curmudgeon claiming that the Acme Flying School’s training is GOOD? Well, sure, and, in case you haven’t figured it out yet, I’ll let you in on my thinking. […]

#238 Pitch and Power

There may be no better symbol of how flight training is conducted than the old debate about what controls speed and what controls altitude. […]

#237 Tara’s “Aha!” Moment

 

Written in July, 2019

All of us who fly are indebted to our flight instructors. There are good ones and not so good ones. But they guide their students to their private pilot certificates and in doing so they teach a whole bunch of details. In fact, the number of facts they […]

#236 The Most Memorable Flight

 

 

Written in June, 2019

 

 

I’ve often said that Steve Oliver is the smartest aviator I know. Perhaps that’s why when Steve mentioned the most memorable flight he’d ever had, I listened. I’d never thought about it before, but the flight that had meant so much to Steve was the […]

#235 The Tailwheel Town Landing

“…Why do you suppose that Acme Grads land the way they do? They make high, wide downwinds, then keep the power in and the flaps down while they fly a huge pattern that ends at some point on the runway. ” […]

#234 Air Awareness

“I remember one such time when a friend and I were offered a chance to ride in the Catalina that was part of the Erickson Aircraft collection. We sat in the voluminous back of the plane as Brent Conner rumbled the old ship down to the approach end of the runway. He did the runup and one mag on one engine dropped a lot. Brent decided that some work needed to be done and it wasn’t worth departing with that bad mag. So we never flew, but it was Air Awareness time. And it was worth something to us all.” […]

“G” Available

I’ve got some questions: Howcum most CFIs think that bank angle affects stall speed? Howcum most pilots never fly behind an accelerometer unless they are flying an aerobatic airplane. And, speaking of accelerometers, howcum most who have one, use it to safely fly the aircraft at less than max g? The Accelerometer. This is a […]

#232 The Go-Around

“He was carrying power, even though he was too high. But we’re used to seeing that. After all, that’s how Acme trains. As he approached short final, we called to THAT unhearing pilot, “Go around, go around!” […]

#231 Flying Shoes

“A treatise about this subject wouldn’t be complete without an argument from the other side. The reason given for shoeless flight is usually the same. The shoeless fliers claim that their feet are then more sensitive to rudder pedals and brake. Although they may be right, I don’t think they are right enough to cancel the lack of safety. So I usually say to them, “Get over it”. […]